Bob Dylan: Rough and Rowdy Ways Album Review | Pitchfork

Since 1997’s Time Out of Mind, an atmospheric return-to-form after a long period of wandering, death has been Dylan’s chief concern, to the extent that some have read it as a personal obsession. Which, of course, has only aggravated him. Yes, his recent songs deal with mortality. “But I didn’t see any one critic say: ‘It deals with my mortality’—you know, his own,” Dylan observed. It seems that he has accepted this grievance as an artistic failure and has returned with songs whose subjects cannot be misinterpreted. The last two tracks on Tempest addressed the sinking of the Titanic and the murder of John Lennon—historical events that now exist through a greater cultural consciousness. He continues and improves upon this method throughout Rough and Rowdy Ways, using notes from history to reflect something universal about our own brief, ordinary legacies. “I hope that the gods go easy with me,” he sings in “I’ve Made Up My Mind to Give Myself to You.” For a minute, you forget the status of the man singing; his prayer sounds as humble, as fragile as anyone’s. Source: Bob Dylan: Rough and Rowdy Ways Album Review | Pitchfork

‘The Velvet Underground’: Film Review | Cannes 2021 – The Hollywood Reporter

IN a minute they will dazzle. Any second they could blow your mind. The wealth of archival photography and footage of news and cultural events that shaped the era is extraordinary. Haynes’ use not just of clips from the work of Warhol, Mekas and Smith, but also Stan Brakhage, Kenneth Anger, Maya Deren, Marie Menken, Barbara Rubin, Shirley Clarke and others — often playing in mind-bending juxtaposition on multiple screens within the screen — makes this an uncommonly cine-literate music doc and a rapturous homage to experimental art. Mekas says it all in one succinct interview snippet: “We are not part of the counterculture. We are the culture.” Source: ‘The Velvet Underground’: Film Review | Cannes 2021 – The Hollywood Reporter

Graded on a Curve: John Cale, Vintage Violence – The Vinyl District

One of my all time favourite albums and certainly favourite songwriters. Having split the Velvet Underground, John Cale might easily have packed up his viola and avant garde bona fides and disappeared forever into the obscure realm of experimental music. Instead he’s had it both ways, interspersing LPs like 1997’s Eat/Kiss: Music for the Films by Andy Warhol with more traditional art rock (God I hate that term) albums like Vintage Violence. Lou Reed went on to join the greats, but by any standard Cale’s albums of the early to mid-1970’s stand up to those released by Reed during the same period. There’s much to be said for Reed’s aggression, but Cale’s emotional detachment also has its lure. In “Hanky Panky Nohow” Cale sings about “seducing down the door.” Which to my way of thinking is just as good as Reed’s approach, which was to kick it in. Source: Graded on a Curve: John Cale, Vintage Violence – The Vinyl District

At the end of June 1967, The Beatles Played Live to an Audience of 400 Million. Is It Any Wonder George Fluffed His Solo? | GuitarPlayer

The way sound Engineer Geoff Emerick remembers it, the day before the broadcast, Brian Epstein talked the band into rush-releasing the performance as a single.”John, of course, was keen,” says Emerick, in his book Here, There And Everywhere, “it was his song, after all. It didn’t take much effort to talk Paul into it, either… Only George Harrison was reluctant; presumably he was worried that he might muff his solo, even though it was only four bars long. He was finally persuaded when George Martin assured him that we could stay late afterward and do any necessary repair work.” Source: At the end of June 1967, The Beatles Played Live to an Audience of 400 Million. Is It Any Wonder George Fluffed His Solo? | GuitarPlayer

Why I ❤️ Deep Purple’s Made In Japan, by Yngwie Malmsteen | Louder

I was just nine or 10 years old when my elder brother brought home Made In Japan. I’d already heard Deep Purple’s In Rock and Fireball, both of which had affected me in Biblical proportions. For some unbelievable reason I wasn’t familiar with Machine Head, the studio album that so much of Made In Japan is based on. I went out and got Machine Head because I had loved Made In Japan so much, but as a naïve little kid from Sweden I couldn’t understand why Lazy and Space Truckin’ had suddenly become so short. No other live album had such a huge impact on me. Made In Japan had so much crazy energy, man. Back then, without the internet, MP3 players and thousands of radio stations to choose from, hearing a new record for the first time was such a religious experience. I actually wore out three or four copies of the vinyl edition. Source: Why I ❤️ Deep Purple’s Made In Japan, by Yngwie Malmsteen | Louder

Jeff Beck: my stories of Jimi Hendrix, Jimmy Page, Stevie Ray Vaughan and more | Louder

Mick JaggerI used to get mistaken for him all the time in ’61. I used to have girls screaming at me and I didn’t know what the fuck they were screaming about. I’d pull up along somebody in a car and they’d go: “Mick!” And I’d be thinking: “Who the fuck is this Mick?” Then I realised it was this guy in The Rolling Stones called Mick Jagger.AdvertisementI was always thinking: “I wonder if I could play in that band?” I seemed to fit the style, loved the blues and all the rest of it. I kept my eye on them. And lo and behold Mick calls me up and wants me to do an album [She’s The Boss]. And that was the first time I met him. I thought Mick was charming. He treated me really well. Loved women, of course. Source: Jeff Beck: my stories of Jimi Hendrix, Jimmy Page, Stevie Ray Vaughan and more | Louder

Story behind Paint It Black – Rolling Stones

From the Ultimate 60s Fan Page — — – – — This is written from the viewpoint of a person who is depressed; he wants everything to turn black to match his mood. There was no specific inspiration for the lyrics. When asked at the time why he wrote a song about death, Mick Jagger replied: “I don’t know. It’s been done before. It’s not an original thought by any means. It all depends on how you do it.” The song seems to be about a lover who died: “I see a line of cars and they’re all painted black” – The hearse and limos. “With flowers and my love both never to come back” – The flowers from the funeral and her in the hearse. He talks about his heart being black because of his loss. “I could not foresee this thing happening to you” – It was an unexpected and sudden death. “If I look hard enough into the setting sun, my love will laugh with me before the morning comes” – This refers to her in Heaven. The Rolling Stones wrote this as a much slower, conventional soul song. When Bill Wyman began fooling around on the organ during the session doing a takeoff of their original as a spoof of music played at Jewish weddings. Co-managerContinue Reading