10 Things You Might Not Know About the SM58

We’re celebrating the vocal mic’s 50th anniversary with true tales from its storied past, courtesy of Shure Historian Michael Pettersen. Source: 10 Things You Might Not Know About the SM58 | Shure Blog The Shure SM58 has become the touchstone for a professional vocal microphone, perfect in form, function, and feel. For many musicians, it is the only microphone needed for their entire career. Everywhere people make music, and for almost as long as music has been amplified, the SM58 has been “what you sing through.” If any product has ever earned the title of “worldwide industry standard,” surely the SM58 is it.

LISTEN: RADIOHEAD COVERS GLEN CAMPBELL’S ‘RHINESTONE COWBOY’

Glen Campbell, the Rhinestone Cowboy himself, passed away the morning of Tuesday, August 8. The 81 year old country legend had been diagnosed with Alzheimer’s four years earlier, a diagnosis he coped with in his later music, most notably his final album, Adios, released just two months before his death. A string of tribute covers have since surfaced on the internet, one being a Radiohead cover of “Rhinestone Cowboy,” recorded in 1993. Though it seems to be a collision of two worlds — Campbell’s country pop and Radiohead’s experimental rock — it goes to show the influence of his legacy.

The 15 Best Delta Blues Songs

“The blues are some of the most iconic sounds of America. What began in the South in the late 19th century as a mix of work songs and spirituals evolved into a mostly secular, acoustic guitar driven musical embodiment of suffering, struggle and—in the best case scenarios—triumph that proliferated during the early-to-mid 20th century. But the blues also encompass a range of regional dialects. The West Coast blues, mostly centered in California, incorporated more piano work and jazz influences during the 1940s, while the Chicago blues electrified some these sounds in the 1950s and ‘60s. The Hill Country blues of northern Mississippi used a rhythmic, repetitive style of guitar playing with mirrored vocals. But it was the Delta blues, hailing from the area surrounding the delta of the Mississippi River, which truly began the movement of the blues and encapsulates the style, genre and soul of what we now call, “the blues.”” Source: The 15 Best Delta Blues Songs :: Music :: Lists :: delta blues :: Paste

Brian Eno Explains the Loss of Humanity in Modern Music | Open Culture

In music, as in film, we have reached a point where every element of every composition can be fully produced and automated by computers. This is a breakthrough that allows producers with little or no musical training the ability to rapidly turn out hits. Source: Brian Eno Explains the Loss of Humanity in Modern Music | Open Culture At practice I never want to get it perfect. I agree with Eno’s logic entirely and have expressed it many times myself to bandmates. Leaving the errors in keeps it fresh. When recording, it’s the plugins that you do not use that keep the songs, originals or covers, interesting and unique. You know that almost every other DIY musician out there are throwing as much tech. at the process of recording as they can, sometimes to make up for lack of talent, but, I believe, more likely, because they feel they have to –everyone else is doing it. D

Unpacking the Absurd Logic Of Cultural Appropriation—And What It Costs | Observer

It is not stealing or looting to take things that inspire you in one culture and adapt and change them to further your own expression. Source: Unpacking the Absurd Logic Of Cultural Appropriation—And What It Costs | Observer “While I was there, I was just gathering images and names, and ideas and rhythms, and I was storing all of these things … in my mind somewhere. And when it was time to sit down and write songs, when I reached into the attic to see what I was gonna write about, that’s what was there. I just felt a strong passion toward the discovery of going there, and it opened my eyes, and all my senses were overwhelmed by the feeling of that place. When I sat down to write songs, that’s all I could think of…”

My Buddy: Patti Smith Remembers Sam Shepard | The New Yorker

Sam liked being on the move. He’d throw a fishing rod or an old acoustic guitar in the back seat of his truck, maybe take a dog, but for sure a notebook, and a pen, and a pile of books. He liked packing up and leaving just like that, going west. He liked getting a role that would take him somewhere he really didn’t want to be, but where he would wind up taking in its strangeness; lonely fodder for future work. Source: My Buddy: Patti Smith Remembers Sam Shepard | The New Yorker