The day John Lennon became a disc jockey on New York’s biggest radio station | Louder

A fun-loving guy for sure In his storied four-decade career in radio, that rainy September afternoon remains a highlight. “I’m so happy that it literally has stood the test of time,” Elsas said. “It was totally unscripted and off the cuff. John was just a musician up to chat about his new album, very happy, and talking to a fan who just happened to be a disc jockey with a radio show. It captured a moment in time. I’m still so pleased that I got to do it.” Source: The day John Lennon became a disc jockey on New York’s biggest radio station | Louder

John Lennon ‘Whatever Gets You Thru The Night’

Meanwhile, the follow‑up single to ‘Whatever Gets You Thru The Night’ began life with the working title of ‘So Long Ago’ and took its initial melody from the orchestral arrangement to Harry Nilsson’s version of ‘Many Rivers To Cross’, the opening track on his Pussy Cats album which Lennon had produced earlier in the year. This was then embellished by words that came to John in a dream, involving a couple of women echoing his name. Hence the eventual title, ‘#9 Dream’, which continued Lennon’s fascination with the number that followed him from birth to the grave. Born on October 9th, 1940, his first home was at 9 Newcastle Road in Liverpool; Beatles manager Brian Epstein first saw the group play on November 9th, 1961; John met Yoko on November 9th, 1966; in 1968, he constructed the sound collage ‘Revolution 9′ for the Beatles’ ‘White Album’; in New York, he and Yoko lived in the Dakota building on West 72nd Street (seven and two is nine); in 1975, their son, Sean, was born on John’s birthday, October 9th; and when John was shot and killed just after 11pm on December 8th, 1980, it was December 9th back in England. Source: John Lennon ‘Whatever Gets You Thru The Night’

Ringo Starr and Paul McCartney record version of lost Lennon song

Sir Ringo enlisted the help of Sir Paul, 77, to play bass on the track, which he admitted had brought him to tears when he first heard it. He said: “Jack asked if I ever heard The Bermuda Tapes, John’s demos from that time. And I had never heard all this. “The idea that John was talking about me in that time before he died, well, I’m an emotional person. “And I just loved this song. I sang it the best that I could. I do well up when I think of John this deeply. And I’ve done my best. We’ve done our best.” The Beatles (PA) Source: Ringo Starr and Paul McCartney record version of lost Lennon song