Bob Dylan: Rough and Rowdy Ways Album Review | Pitchfork

Since 1997’s Time Out of Mind, an atmospheric return-to-form after a long period of wandering, death has been Dylan’s chief concern, to the extent that some have read it as a personal obsession. Which, of course, has only aggravated him. Yes, his recent songs deal with mortality. “But I didn’t see any one critic say: ‘It deals with my mortality’—you know, his own,” Dylan observed. It seems that he has accepted this grievance as an artistic failure and has returned with songs whose subjects cannot be misinterpreted. The last two tracks on Tempest addressed the sinking of the Titanic and the murder of John Lennon—historical events that now exist through a greater cultural consciousness. He continues and improves upon this method throughout Rough and Rowdy Ways, using notes from history to reflect something universal about our own brief, ordinary legacies. “I hope that the gods go easy with me,” he sings in “I’ve Made Up My Mind to Give Myself to You.” For a minute, you forget the status of the man singing; his prayer sounds as humble, as fragile as anyone’s. Source: Bob Dylan: Rough and Rowdy Ways Album Review | Pitchfork

The top 10 cities for full-time songwriters | DIY Musician Blog

4. Toronto, Canada I recently hung out with one of Toronto’s heads of Government arts funding. Let’s just say she had an annual arts budget comparable to the salary of an NBA superstar. All of that money went to Ontario-based indie artists to release their own albums.  Toronto also has perhaps the highest talent per capita I’ve seen (one man’s opinion). The tolerance for rubbish music in Toronto is low. You’ve got to have the chops to survive and get slots at the decent clubs.  Ontario has a blossoming house concert circuit and vibrant festival scene. Cost of living is high and competition is fierce, but surrounding oneself with this amount of ferocious talent can only up your game. Dine Alone Records is an underground legend in the label world, fostering acts like Heartless Bastards, Delta Spirit, Matthew Logan Vasquez, Field Report, and The Lumineers.  Source: The top 10 cities for full-time songwriters | DIY Musician Blog

Iman Says She ‘Will Never Remarry’ Following David Bowie’s Death | Billboard

Former supermodel Iman has opened up about the pain and loneliness following the death of her legendary husband David Bowie, who passed away January 2016 after a battle with cancer. The 63-year-old fashion icon, who was married to Bowie for 24 years, says the past two years without her husband have been difficult. One thing she hasn’t gotten used to is fans sharing their condolences. “People take pictures of me in the street, and say (touching my arm), ‘I am so sorry for your loss,’” she told fashion site Porter Edit. “I’m like, don’t touch me. You just took pictures of me, how can you be sorry?” more @ Source: Iman Says She ‘Will Never Remarry’ Following David Bowie’s Death | Billboard

How John Lennon Ended Up in an Ad for a Guitar He Only | Reverb News

It was Beatlemania gone mad around Christmas 1964. The Beatles played a residency of seasonal shows at a theatre in West London from Christmas Eve right through the first few weeks of the new year. Paul played his Hofner bass, Ringo thrashed a Ludwig set, George switched between his Rickenbacker 12-string, a Gretsch Country Gent, and a Gretsch Tennessean, and John played his Rickenbacker 325. Until, that is, John got so caught up in all the excitement that he managed to do some serious damage to his workhorse Rick, dropping it off the Hammersmith Odeon stage. Lennon plays his Rickenbacker 325 on the Ed Sullivan show in 1965. Startled, John gave the guitar a quick once-over, turning it quickly this way and that. Relieved, he decided it looked alright. But when he went to play the guitar at the following night’s performance, he found the more he played it, the more it went out of tune. Between songs, he took a closer look, and to his horror he noticed a crack going from the nut around the back of the headstock. Oh dear, he thought. Or words to that effect. What to do? Rose-Morris to the rescue. Source: How John Lennon Ended Up in an Ad for a Guitar He Only | Reverb News

Crosby, Stills, Nash & Young May Reunite Over The One Thing They Hate More Than Each Other

Crosby, Stills, Nash & Young May Reunite Over The One Thing They Hate More Than Each Other George Pimentel / WireImage / Getty Images Wait…What? Folk rock supergroup Crosby, Stills, Nash, and Young have had an on again-off again relationship that’s nearly as famous as their music, their feuds stretching on for decades; in fact, Neil Young and Graham Nash aren’t on speaking terms with bandmate David Crosby as of 2018, though Young did say he wouldn’t quite rule out a reunion with Crosby after the 76-year-old walked back negative comments made about Young’s girlfriend, Daryl Hannah. Though it’s not likely that these four will ever hang out and reminisce about old times, it does look like Crosby, Stills, Nash and Young are willing to set aside their dislike for each other in favor of a reunion against the one thing they really don’t like: President Donald Trump. more: http://dailyrockbox.com/crosby-stills-nash-young-may-reunite-over-the-one-thing-they-hate-more-than-each-other/?a=MM&var=CSNYReunionPossibility-ROCK&utm_campaign=csnyreunionpossibility&utm_source=facebook&utm_medium=social&utm_term=author-mm-posted_by-mm-repost-rock&utm_content=csny In an interview with Billboard, David Crosby outlined exactly why the possibility of a CSNY reunion isn’t too far out of the realm of possibility and why the 60s rock legends feel their presence is needed once again: “We don’t get along, and we haven’t gotten along for a while. They’re all mad at me. But they all dislike Donald Trump very much, the same way I do. We dislike him intenselyContinue Reading