Ringo Starr and Paul McCartney record version of lost Lennon song

Sir Ringo enlisted the help of Sir Paul, 77, to play bass on the track, which he admitted had brought him to tears when he first heard it. He said: “Jack asked if I ever heard The Bermuda Tapes, John’s demos from that time. And I had never heard all this. “The idea that John was talking about me in that time before he died, well, I’m an emotional person. “And I just loved this song. I sang it the best that I could. I do well up when I think of John this deeply. And I’ve done my best. We’ve done our best.” The Beatles (PA) Source: Ringo Starr and Paul McCartney record version of lost Lennon song

Layla in Real Life: 10 Songs Written About Pattie Boyd | Mental Floss

The ex-wife of both George Harrison and Eric Clapton made music history by asking two questions: “Prisoners?’ and “Do I look alright?” The “Prisoners?” line was her only line in a Hard Day’s Night movie. The “Do I look alright?” line was what she said to Eric Clapton while he was writing the song “Wonderful Tonight”. Songwriting, it’s a process that can’t be duplicated by a machine or machine people. Source: Layla in Real Life: 10 Songs Written About Pattie Boyd | Mental Floss

The Book of Prince | The New Yorker

In the portico of the Country Inn, he put the car in park. “I’ve never seen race, in a certain way—I’ve tried to be nice to everyone,” he said. He seemed to think that too few of his white contemporaries had the same open-mindedness, even as they fêted him for it. When it came time to sell and promote the book, Prince wanted to deal only with people who accepted that he had his own business practices. “There’s a lot of people who say you gotta learn to walk before you learn to run,” he said. “That’s slave talk to me. That’s something slaves would say.” He offered me a firm handshake and left me at the hotel’s automatic doors. Source: The Book of Prince | The New Yorker

The coming death of just about every rock legend

Actually this is a bullshit article but well worth reading for the perspective it provides or should I say POV. Like all monumental acts of creativity, the artists were driven by an aspiration to transcend their own finitude, to create something of lasting value, something enduring that would live beyond those who created it. Source: The coming death of just about every rock legend