What happened when The Rolling Stones and Lynyrd Skynyrd played Knebworth | Louder

In 1976, the Stones pulled a vast crowd to Knebworth. It was a day of surprises, not least how late everything ran. In 2007, Classic Rock delivered this eye witness account ““We were supposed to finish by midnight,” Bannister remembers, “and it eventually ended at about 2am, I think David (now Lord) Cobbold, who held the licence, got fined £2,000.” As The Who’s Baba O’Riley provided the triumphal soundtrack to our first stumble into an unlit ditch, we staggered off into the breaking dawn. It took four hours to find the car, but as we’d just seen Keith Richards smoking a cigarette, we didn’t mind a bit.” Source: What happened when The Rolling Stones and Lynyrd Skynyrd played Knebworth | Louder

John Phillips: The Sordid Life of ‘The Mamas and the Papas’ Co-Founder

Sordid indeed! “Mackenzie went on to say that her incestuous relationship with her father had become consensual and the two engaged in sexual activity for years despite being directly related and both being married. Mackenzie eventually became a member of the New Mamas and the Papas, and toured with John during the early 1980s. John apparently wanted to run away with her to a country where their relationship wouldn’t be looked down upon. But the incestuous relationship eventually ended when Mackenzie became pregnant and was unsure of who had fathered the child. John paid for her to have an abortion, but it was from that point, Mackenzie said, that “I never let him touch me again.” The musical architect of The Mamas and the Papas, John Phillips, had a short and sordid life that involved drama, drugs, and incest. Source: John Phillips: The Sordid Life of ‘The Mamas and the Papas’ Co-Founder

The day John Lennon became a disc jockey on New York’s biggest radio station | Louder

A fun-loving guy for sure In his storied four-decade career in radio, that rainy September afternoon remains a highlight. “I’m so happy that it literally has stood the test of time,” Elsas said. “It was totally unscripted and off the cuff. John was just a musician up to chat about his new album, very happy, and talking to a fan who just happened to be a disc jockey with a radio show. It captured a moment in time. I’m still so pleased that I got to do it.” Source: The day John Lennon became a disc jockey on New York’s biggest radio station | Louder