Kim Gordon: ‘Women aren’t allowed to be kick-ass. I refused to play the game’ | Music | The Guardian

Thurston and I didn’t look at each other once, and when the song was done, I turned my shoulders to the audience so no one in the audience or the band could see my face, though it had little effect. Everything I did and said was broadcast from one of the two 40ft-high on-stage video screens.

Kim Gordon.
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Kim Gordon. Photograph: Pari Dukovic for the Guardian

Throughout that last show, I remember wondering what the audience was picking up on. What they saw and what I saw were probably two different things. During Sugar Kane, the next-to-last song, an oceanic blue globe appeared on the screen behind the band. It spun extremely slowly, as if to convey the world’s indifference to its own turning and rolling. It all just goes on, the globe said, as ice melts, and streetlights switch colours when no cars are around, and grass pushes through sidewalk cracks, and things are born and then go away.

When the song ended, Thurston thanked the audience. “I can’t wait to see you again,” he said. The band closed with Teen Age Riot. I sang, or half-sang, the first lines: “Spirit desire. Face me. Spirit desire. We will fall. Miss me. Don’t dismiss me.”

Marriage is a long conversation, someone once said, and maybe so is a rock band’s life. A few minutes later, both were done.

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